Islam Stories, Qur'an Stories, Prophet Stories Children Stories, True Stories, Short Stories
islamicoccasions.com
MASUMEEN STORIES
Love in Islam (Al-Hubb)
Prophet Muhammad sa
Imam Ali ibn Abi Talib
Sayyida Fatima Zahra
Imam Hasan stories
Imam Husayn stories
Imam Zain al Abidin as
Imam al-Baqir stories
Imam Jafar Sadiq (as)
Imam Musa Kadhim (as)
Imam Ali Reza stories
Imam al-Taqi stories
Imam Hadi, 10th Imam
Imam Hassan al-Askari
Imam Mahdi (as)
Hazrat Zainab (sa)
14 MASUMEEN
Ahlul Bayt, Ahl al-Bayt
First Masoom
Second Masoom
Third Masoom
Fourth Masoom
Fifth Masoom
Sixth Masoom
Seventh Masoom
Eighth Masoom
Ninth Masoom
Tenth Masoom
Eleventh Masoom
Twelveth Masoom
Thirteenth Masoom
Fourteenth Masoom
COMMUNITY CENTER
Islamic Mailing List
Islamic Guestbook
Islamic Discussion
Hajj-e-Baytullah
We are not responsible for the contents of external websites "Ads by Google"
Inspiring Stories for Students: Fisherman Story!

Inspiring Stories for Students: Fisherman StoryOne day a fisherman was lying on a beautiful beach with his fishing pole propped up in the sand and his solitary line cast out into the sparkling blue surf.

He was enjoying the warmth of the afternoon sun and the prospect of catching a fish.

About that time, a businessman came walking down the beach trying to relieve some of the stress of his workday. He noticed the fisherman sitting on the beach and decided to find out why this fisherman was fishing instead of working harder to make a living for himself and his family.

"You aren't going to catch many fish that way," said the businessman to the fisherman, "you should be working rather than lying on the beach!"

The fisherman looked up at the businessman, smiled and replied, "And what will my reward be?"

"Well, you can get bigger nets and catch more fish!" was the businessman's answer.

"And then what will my reward be?" asked the fisherman, still smiling.

The businessman replied, "You will make money and you'll be able to buy a boat which will then result in larger catches of fish!"

"And then what will my reward be?" asked the fisherman again.

The businessman was beginning to get a little irritated with the fisherman's questions.

"You can buy a bigger boat and hire some people to work for you!" he said.

"And then what will my reward be?" repeated the fisherman.

The businessman was getting angry. "Don't you understand? You can build up a fleet of fishing boats, sail all over the world, and let all your employees catch fish for you!"

Once again the fisherman asked, "And then what will my reward be?"

The businessman was red with rage and shouted at the fisherman, "Don't you understand that you can become so rich that you will never have to work for your living again! You can spend all the rest of your days sitting on this beach looking at the sunset. You won't have a care in the world!"

The fisherman, still smiling, simply looked up, nodded and said: "And what do you think I am doing now?" He then looked at the sunset, with his pole in the water, without a care in the world.

However, both the fisherman and the businessman were wrong in their materialistic outlook. We don't have to work hard so that we become rich, sit in the beach and have no care in the world. Islam teaches us to work hard to serve our family and our community and earn the pleasure of Allah (swt), regardless of whether we are poor or rich.

Inspiring Stories for Students: Grasshopper and Ant story of Hard Work bring Success

Grasshopper and Ant storyOne cold, frosty day in the middle of winter a colony of ants was busy drying out some, grains of corn, which had grown damp during the wet autumn weather.

A grasshopper half dead with cold and hunger, came up to one of the ants. "Please give me a grail or two from your store of corn to save my life," he said faintly.

"We worked day and night to get this corn in. Why should I give it to you?" asked the ant crossly. "Whatever were you doing all last summer when you should have been gathering your food?"

Oh I didn't have time for things like that, said the grasshopper. "I was far too busy singing to carry corn about."

The ant laughed I unkindly. "In that case you can sing all winter as far as I am concerned," he said. And without another word he turned back to his work.

Islam teaches us that we should help the less fortunate. But it also teaches us that we must work hard and not rely on the kindness of others for our daily needs.

Inspiring Stories for Students: Fruits of labour (Hard Work bring Success)

Fruits of labour (Hard Work bring Success)There once lived a rich businessman who had a lazy and fun loving son. The businessman wanted his son to be hard-working and responsible. He wanted him to realize the value of labour. One day he summoned his son and said: "Today, I want you to go out and earn something, failing which you won't have your meals tonight."

The boy was callous and not used to any kind of work. This demand by his father scared him and he went crying straight to his mother. Her heart melted at the sight of tears in her son's eyes. She grew restless. In a bid to help him she gave him a gold coin. In the evening when the father asked his son what he had earned, the son promptly presented him the gold coin. The father then asked him to throw it into a well. The son did as he was told.

The father was a man of wisdom and experience and guessed that the source of the gold coin was the boy's mother. The next day he sent his wife to her parent's town and asked his son to go and earn something with the threat of being denied the night meals if he failed. This time he went crying to his sister who sympathized with him and gave him a rupee coin out of her own savings. When his father asked him what he had earned the boy tossed the rupee coin at him. The father again asked him to throw it in a well. The son did it quite readily. Again the father's wisdom told him that the rupee coin was not earned by his son. He then sent his daughter to her in-laws' house. He again asked his son to go out and earn with the threat that he shall not have anything for dinner that night.

This time since there was no one to help him out; the son was forced to go to the market in search of work. One of the shopkeepers there told him that he would pay him two rupees if he carried his trunk to his house. The rich man's son could not refuse and was drenched in sweat by the time he finished the job. His feet were trembling and his neck and back were aching. There were rashes on his back. As he returned home and produced the two rupee note before his father and was asked to throw it into the well, the horrified son almost cried out. He could not imagine throwing his hard-earned money like this. He said amid sobbing: "Father! My entire body is aching. My back has rashes and you are asking me to throw the money into the well."

At this the businessman smiled. He told him that one feels the pain only when the fruits of hard labour are wasted. On earlier two occasions he was helped by his mother and sister and therefore had no pain in throwing the coins into the well. The son had now realized the value of hard work. He vowed never to be lazy and safe keep the father's wealth. The father handed over the keys of his shop to the son and promised to guide him through the rest of the life.

Moral of the Story: Some of the life's best lessons come from the hardest situations.

A great lesson of life from one of the smallest creatures of Allah (SWT): Ant Story

A great lesson of life from one of the smallest creatures of Allah (SWT): Ant StoryOne morning I wasted nearly an hour watching a tiny ant carry a huge feather cross my back terrace. Several times it was confronted by obstacles in its path and after a momentary pause it would make the necessary detour.

At one point the ant had to negotiate a crack in the concrete about 10mm wide. After brief contemplation the ant laid the feather over the crack, walked across it and picked up the feather on the other side then continued on its way.

I was fascinated by the ingenuity of this ant, one of Allah's smallest creatures. It served to reinforce the miracle of creation. Here was a minute insect, lacking in size yet equipped with a brain to reason, explore, discover and overcome. But this ant, like the two-legged co-residents of this planet, also shares human failings.

After some time the ant finally reached its destination - a flower bed at the end of the terrace and a small hole that was the entrance to its underground home. And it was here that the ant finally met its match. How could that large feather possibly fit down small hole?

Of course it couldn't. So the ant, after all this trouble and exercising great ingenuity, overcoming problems all along the way, just abandoned the feather and went home.

The ant had not thought the problem through before it began its epic journey and in the end the feather was nothing more than a burden.

Isn't our life like that?

We worry about our family; we worry about money or the lack of it, we worry about work, about where we live, about all sorts of things. These are all burdens - the things we pick up along life's path and lug them around the obstacles and over the crevasses that life will bring, only to find that at the destination they are useless and we can't take them with US......

Inspiring Stories for Students: Are you a wealthy Man?

Are you a wealthy Man?A saint was praying silently. A wealthy merchant, observing the saint's devotion and sincerity, was deeply touched by him. The merchant offered the saint a bag of gold. "I know that you will use the money for Allah's sake. Please take it."

"Just a moment." The saint replied. "I'm not sure if it is lawful for me to take your money. Are you a wealthy man? Do you have more money at home?

"Oh yes. I have at least one thousand gold pieces at home," claimed the merchant proudly.

"Do you want a thousand gold pieces more? Asked the saint.

"Why not, of course yes. Every day I work hard to earn more money."

"And do you wish for yet a thousand gold pieces more beyond that?"

"Certainly. Every day I pray that I may earn more and more money."

The saint pushed the bag of gold back to the merchant. "I am sorry, but I cannot take your gold," he said. "A wealthy man cannot take money from a beggar."

"How can you call yourself a wealthy man and me a beggar?" the merchant spluttered.

The saint replied, "I am a wealthy man because I am content with whatever Allah (SWT) sends me. You are a beggar, because no matter how much you possess, you are always dissatisfied, and always begging Allah (SWT) for more."

ADD TO FAVORITES
Join islamicoccasions.com on Facebook Follow islamicoccasions.com on Twitter Link Akramulla Syed on Linkedin Bookmark and Share islamicoccasions.com email islamicoccasions.com
NOBLE QUR'AN
We narrate to you the best of narratives, by Our revealing to you this Qur'an, though before this you were certainly one of those who did not know. (Noble Qur'an 12:3)
ANECDOTES
Islam and Discrimination
Nasiba the hero
The granted prayer
Revoked protection
INTERESTING STORIES
Values & Principles
Religious Stories
Islamic Stories
Interesting Stories
Bad Habits Stories
Inspirational Story
Muslim Families
Islamic Games, Puzzles
Story of Prophet Isa as
Prophet Moses (pbuh)
Prophet Stories
Tiflaan-e-Muslim
COMPANIONS STORY
Hazrat Salman al-Farsi
Hazrat Abu Zar Ghaffari
Hazrat Ammar ibn Yasir
Miqdad ibn Aswad (ra)
Hazrat Hamzah
Hazrat Malik al-Ashtar
Hazrat Bilal Ibn Rabah
Meesam-e-Tammar (ra)
ISLAMIC FEATURES
Muslim Downloads
Names of Allah
Lineage of Prophets
MP3 Holy Quran
Please Recite Surah Al-Fatiha
Subscribe to Islamic Newsletter
We are not responsible for the contents of external websites "Ads by Google"

Islamic Occasions | Holy Ramadan | Hajj-e-Baytullah | Islam Page | Screensavers | Mazloom Hussain | Muslim Matrimonial
Islamic Moral Stories is designed by Akramulla Syed Last Updated: Wednesday, June 13, 2012