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Anger Management Moral Stories in Islam: The King, Genghis Khan and his Hawk

Anger Management Moral Stories in IslamOne morning Genghis Khan, the great king and warrior, rode out into the woods to have a day's sport. Many of his friends were with him. They rode out, carrying their bows and arrows. It was a merry hunting party. They expected to carry much game home in the evening. On the king's wrist sat his favorite Hawk, for in those days Hawks were trained to hunt. At a word from their masters they would fly high up into the air, and look around for prey. If they chanced to see a deer or a rabbit, they would swoop down upon it swift as any arrow.

All day long Genghis Khan and his huntsmen rode through the woods. But they did not find as much game as they expected. Toward evening they started for home. The king, Genghis Khan had often ridden through the woods and he knew all the paths. So while the rest of the party took the nearest way, he went by a longer road through a valley between two mountains. The day had been warm, and the king was very thirsty. His pet Hawk left his wrist and flown away. It would be sure to find its way home.

The king, Genghis Khan rode slowly along. He had once seen a spring of clear water near this pathway. If he could only find it now! But the hot days of summer had dried up all the mountain brooks.

At last, to his joy, he saw some water trickling down over the edge of a rock. He knew that there was a spring farther up. In the wet season, a swift stream of water always poured down here; but now it came only one drop at a time. The king, Genghis Khan leaped from his horse. He took a little silver cup from his hunting bag. He held it so as to catch the slowly falling drops.

It took a long time to fill the cup; and the king was so thirsty that he could hardly wait. At last it was nearly full. He put the cup to his lips, and was about to drink. All at once there was a whirring sound in the air, and the cup was knocked from his hands. The water was all spilled upon the ground. The king, Genghis Khan looked up to see who had done this thing. It was his pet Hawk.

The Hawk flew back and forth a few times, and then alighted among the rocks by the spring.

The king picked up the cup, and again held it to catch the trickling drops.

This time he did not wait so long. When the cup was half full, he lifted it toward his mouth. But before it had touched his lips, the Hawk swooped down again, and knocked it from his hands.

And now the king began to grow angry. He tried again, and for the third time the Hawk kept him from drinking. The king was now very angry indeed. "How do you dare to act so?" he cried. "If I had you in my hands, I would wring your neck!" Then he filled his cup again. But before he tried to drink, he drew his sword. "Now, Sir Hawk," he said, "that is the last time."

He had hardly spoken before the Hawk swooped down and knocked the cup from his hand. But the king was looking for this. With a quick sweep of the sword he struck the bird as it passed.

The next moment the poor Hawk lay bleeding and dying at its master's feet. "That is what you get for your pains," said Genghis Khan. But when he looked for his cup, he found that it had fallen between two rocks, where he could not reach it. "At any rate, I will have a drink from that spring," he said to himself.

With that he began to climb the steep bank to the place from which the water trickled. It was hard work, and the higher he climbed, the thirstier he became. At last he reached the place. There indeed was a pool of water; but what was that lying in the pool, and almost filling it? It was a huge, dead snake of the most poisonous kind. The king stopped. He forgot his thirst. He thought only of the poor dead bird lying on the ground below him.

"The Hawk saved my life!" he cried, "and how did I repay him? He was my best friend, and I have killed him." He clambered down the bank. He took the bird up gently, and laid it in his hunting bag. Then he mounted his horse and rode swiftly home.

The king, Genghis Khan said to himself, "I have learned a sad lesson today and that is, never to do anything in anger."

Moral of the anger management story in Islam: Please don't do any thing in anger, which later on you have to repent for it. Be calm down and control your anger. If you can control one moment of anger, you can escape hundred days of sorrow. When anger rises think of the consequences. We need to consider our actions and what the consequences will be.

Anger Management Moral Stories in Islam: Give it a little time for Anger to settle down!

Give it a little time for Anger to settle downOnce Buddha was walking from one town to another town with some of his disciples. While they were traveling, they happened to pass a lake.

They stopped there and Buddha told one of his disciples, "I am thirsty. Do get me some water from that lake there."

The disciple walked up to the lake. When he reached it, he noticed that right at that moment, a bullock cart started crossing through the lake. As a result, the water became very muddy, very turbid.

The disciple thought, "How can I give this muddy water to Buddha to drink!"

So he came back and told Buddha, "The water in there is very muddy. I don't think it is fit to drink."

After about half an hour, again Buddha asked the same disciple to go back to the lake and get him some water to drink. The disciple obediently went back to the lake.

This time too he found that the lake was muddy. He returned and informed Buddha about the same.

After sometime, again Buddha asked the same disciple to go back. The disciple reached the lake to find the lake absolutely clean and clear with pure water in it. The mud had settled down and the water above it looked fit for drinking. So he collected some water in a pot and brought it to Buddha.

Buddha looked at the water and then he looked up at the disciple and said, "See what you did to make the water clean. You waited long and the mud settled down on its own and you got clear water. Your mind is also like that! When it is disturbed, just let it be. Give it a little time. It will settle down on its own. You don't have to put in any effort to calm it down. It will happen. It is effortless".

Moral of the anger management story in Islam: Similarly, when you are angry, give some extra time. You can calm down inside. This means not just controlling your outward behavior, but also controlling your internal responses, taking steps to lower your heart rate, calm yourself down, and let the feelings subside.

How a Little Boy Learned to Restrain His Anger and Bad Temper or Nails in the Fence

Nails in the Fence, learn how to control your angerThis is one of those timeless moral stories that teach the importance of restraining bad temper or anger management as per the teachings of Islam.

There once was a little boy who had a bad temper. His father gave him a bag of nails and told him that every time he lost his temper, he must hammer a nail into the back of the fence. The first day the boy had driven 37 nails into the fence. Over the next few weeks, as he learned to control his anger, the number of nails hammered daily gradually dwindled down. He discovered it was easier to hold his temper than to drive those nails into the fence.

Finally the day came when the boy didn't lose his temper at all and learned how to control anger and bad temper. He told his father about it and the father suggested that the boy now pull out one nail for each day that he was able to hold his temper. The days passed and the young boy was finally able to tell his father that all the nails were gone.

The father took his son by the hand and led him to the fence. He said, "You have done well, my son, but look at the holes in the fence. The fence will never be the same. When you say things in anger, they leave a scar just like this one. You can put a knife in a man and draw it out. It won't matter how many times you say I'm sorry, the wound is still there.

The next time you get angry with someone and are about to speak, ask yourself if there was a way to say what you want to say with neutral words. Often the habit of reacting angrily is just that - a habit you learned when you were young and haven't questioned since. You might have become blind to the effect it has on your life.

It is really so that the world reflects back your own attitude. If you constantly wonder why people are angry at you, perhaps it is you who treated them with anger first. Listen to the words and tone of voice you use. And try; really try to speak neutrally to someone who is angry with you. If you know it will be difficult, write the words down first. Rehearse it in your mind. Decide on a prize you will get from Allah (SWT) when you succeed.

Teach your mind intentionally to use respectful words. And you just might find that life begins to feel a lot nicer - because people aren't angry at you anymore.

Our Holy Prophet Muhammad (saw) mentions the tongue before the hand. As everybody knows, the 'wounds' caused by the tongue are deeper and more hurtful than those caused by the hand. Besides, one is often prepared to strike more readily, easily and more frequently with one's tongue than with the hand. Slandering, backbiting, reproaching and other similar ways of hurting people are commoner and more difficult to avoid than hurt done by the hand. Further, if a person can refrain from hurting with the tongue, he can more easily refrain from the assaults by the hand. Again, defending oneself against physical assaults is, in most cases, easier than against verbal assaults of, in particular, backbiting and slandering. So, a true Muslim always restrains his tongue as well as his hand from hurting others.

Learn to control your anger and bad temper as per the teachings of Islam: Do Fingers Grow Back?

Learn to control your anger and bad temper as per the teachings of IslamA man came out of his home to admire his new truck. To his puzzlement, his three-year-old son was happily hammering dents into the shiny paint.

The man ran to his son, knocked him away and hammered the little boy's hands into a pulp as punishment. When the father calmed down, he rushed his son to the hospital.

Upon taking a closer look, the man saw that his little boy had etched the words, "I LOVE YOU DAD" on the truck.

Although the doctor tried desperately to save the crushed bones, he finally had to amputate the fingers from both the boy's hands.

When the boy woke up from the surgery and saw his bandaged stubs, he innocently said, "Daddy, I am sorry about your truck." Then he asked, "But when are my fingers going to grow back?"

Think about the story the next time you see someone spilled milk at a dinner table or hear a baby cry. Think first before you lose your patience and become angry with someone you love. Trucks can be repaired. Broken bones and hurt feelings often cannot.

Too often we fail to recognize the difference between the person and the performance. People make mistakes. We are allowed to make mistakes. But the actions we take while in a rage, anger and bad temper will haunt us forever. Pause and ponder. Think before you act. Be patient.

Always remember: YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO BE ANGRY, BUT YOU HAVE NO RIGHT TO BE CRUEL.

Those who spend (freely) whether in prosperity or in adversity; who restrain their anger and pardon men; And Allah loves those who do good. (Noble Qur'an, 3:134)

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Islamic Moral Stories is designed by Akramulla Syed Last Updated: Thursday, June 23, 2011